Keeping you informed

Lime Kiln Farm is proposed as an extension to Wangford quarry. The proposed extension is located to the east of the existing processing plant.

 

Lime Kiln Farm, Wangford

We tend to take materials like sand and gravel for granted - yet they play an essential role in our lives.

Materials sourced from the UK’s quarries are crucial for the development of sustainable communities.

Cemex plays a key role in creating and maintaining the built environment by supplying materials that build homes, hospitals, roads offices and schools.

The Government recognises that the supply of construction materials such as aggregates is vital to the economy. However, CEMEX’s existing Wangford quarry has less than 2 years of permitted reserves left.

Lime Kiln Farm is proposed as an extension to Wangford Quarry. The proposed extension is located to the east of the existing quarry.

Lime Kiln Farm lies in Waveney District, the County of Suffolk and circa 450 m northeast of the boundary with Suffolk Coastal District. The site is located approximately 1.5km to the southeast of Wangford village.

Suffolk County Council is the Minerals Planning Authority for this area and the proposed site is included in Suffolk County Council’s own draft Minerals and Waste Local Plan (October 2017) as a proposed site for quarrying of gravel.

Whilst Lime Kiln Farm is classified as inside the Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Suffolk Council’s own submission states: “it is accepted that there is an overriding need to work the mineral.”

Few of the ANOB listed characteristics relate to the potential site. Furthermore, whilst the AONB covers 403km2, (or 40 300 hectares), Lime Kiln Farm covers approximately 23 hectares. This equates to only 0.05% of the AONB.

Restoration will be progressive, it will be restored as quarrying progresses rather than leaving it to the end. In this way much of the site will be undisturbed at any one time, either restored or yet to be worked.

The Company is also reviewing the restoration of the entire Wangford site in the light of the Lime Kiln Farm proposal.

The site is estimated to contain approximately 1 mt of high grade sand and gravel covering approximately 23 ha. The grading is 60 per cent gravel, 35 per cent sand and 5 per cent silt.

The high gravel content is unusual in East Anglia. A gravel rich deposit to the east of the Country is both unusual and is of regional significance.

The proposed extraction area comprises 3 parcels of land (west, central and east), bordered by Mardle Road on the west and Hill Road to the south.

Views from the residences in the local area are very limited and this would be further mitigated by phased working, soil screening, gapping up of hedgerows, new replacement tree planting and progressive restoration.

There are no conservation areas within the site. There are no scheduled historical monuments within the site. There are no areas of ancient woodland within the site (the nearest is Reydon wood which is some 750 m to the north of the site).

The site does not contain or overlap any national or international designations for ecological conservation. No Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) or Local Nature Reserves (LNRs) lie within the site.

Having assessed the proposed identification of Lime Kiln Farm as a Preferred Area for mineral extraction in the draft Minerals and Waste Local Plan, Cemex concludes:

Key Facts

  • The proposed site is included in Suffolk County Council Draft Minerals and Waste Local Plan

  • Site approximately 23 hectares in extent;

  • Contains 1 mt of gravel;

  • The sand within the site is not commercially viable and is returned to the quarried site and used as restoration material;

  • The site will be restored predominately back to arable use, but with pockets of tree planting and the reinstatement of both field hedgerows and hedgerow trees. The additional planting and hedgerows will act as biodiversity corridors linking sites to the east and west of Lime Kiln Farm;

  • Potential start of development: 2019

  • Potential end of development: 2030 Estimated operational life: 11 years plus up to two years to complete restoration. The site will then enter a further 5 years of aftercare;

  • The proposed site at Lime Kiln Farm will move the workings away from the reedbeds

  • The high gravel content is very rare in Suffolk. A gravel rich deposit to the east of the Country is both unusual and is of regional significance.

  • Output: 100,000 tpa

  • Proposed working hours: As per existing quarry

  • Estimated HGV per day: As per existing quarry

  • Proposes HGV route: As existing to A12 via Hill Road

  • Likely number of employees: Four full time and 12 part time/contractors

  • At least half of all output will serve the local market

  • The AONB covers 403km2, Lime Kiln Farm covers approximately 23 hectares (although not all will be quarried). This equates to only 0.05% of the AONB.

Contact Information

To make a comment or for further information please contact Mark Kelly at planninggb@cemex.com.


FAQs

Q What is CEMEX proposing at Lime Kiln Farm?

A It's proposed to quarry upto 1million tonnes of sand and gravel over 11 years, restoring the land as quarrying progresses to a mixture of agricultural land and nature conservation uses at a lower level. The Company would want to start quarrying by the end of 2019.

Q Why do you need to submit a planning application when already have an existing quarry?

A The current quarry is likely to run out of gravel by the end of 2019. Wangford is a key site to CEMEX in East Anglia as it possesses an unusually high gravel (coarse) content, which is critical for making concrete. CEMEX has undertaken a search and has not been able to find another gravel rich deposit like Wangford in the County. The only alternative would be to bring in material from further away by ship, train or lorry, increasing development costs in the County.

Q I recall that Council officials objected to your last planning application at Wangford, won't they again?

A Lime Kiln Farm is proposed by the County Council as a Preferred Area for gravel extraction in their draft Minerals and Waste Local Plan. This indicates that the Council consider the suit suitable in principle for quarrying, but planning permission will still need to be applied for and granted, and the application will be determined on its merits, it cannot be assumed that a grant of permission is a forgone conclusion. The draft Plan is also likely to have to be subject to a local inquiry, which is likely to take place early in 2019.

Q Is the local MP opposed to your plans?

A The local MP has expressed concern and CEMEX has met her staff.

Q Will a new site lead to increased traffic, noise and pollution?

A No, the production of aggregates will remain as per the current quarry, which has been situated in its current location for many years.

Q What about visual impact? How many residences will this affect?

A Independent studies have been commissioned by the Company to determine the extent of the proposal's visual impact and to what extent will it be visible from local houses. This work is ongoing, but early results indicate that visibility from local houses will be low (possibly 2 to 3 properties), and that these views can be mitigated to acceptable levels.

Q In what way are you informing the local community and others about your proposals?

A The Company has attended a series of Parish Council meetings in March. The company has also held a public exhibition and quarry open day in April and met with local residents individually. Meeting are also being arranged with the RSPB and Suffolk Wildlife Trust.

Q Should minerals really be extracted within an ANOB?

A There's no embargo on development in an AONB, nor is this part of the AONB a stranger to development (i.e. Adnams distribution centre and solar farm). Government guidance sets a very high bar over which any development proposal in an AONB must pass; the Company believes that in the case of Lime Kiln Farm this can be achieved. Part of its case is that minerals can only be quarried where they lie, and the Company has not been able to identify a deposit as rich in gravel as at Wangford from any site outside the AONB.

Q What restoration plans do you have?

A This is are work in progress, but even at this stage it is proposed that the final restoration will be a mix of agricultural land and nature conservation, with a specific aim of increasing the biodiversity of the land. Any restoration will be progressive, i.e., it will be restored as quarrying progresses rather than leaving it to the end. In this way much of the site will be undisturbed at any one time, either restored or yet to be worked. The Company is also reviewing the restoration of the entire Wangford site in the light of the Lime Kiln Farm proposal.

Q What plans do your propose to protect the flora and fauna?

Independent ecologists have been commissioned by the Company to both assess the ecological value of the site, its surroundings and to advise regards its restoration. This work is at an early stage but the land is intensively cropped arable land.

Q How many people does CEMEX currently employ on site and will there be opportunities for further jobs for local people?

A 4 full time, plus 12 equivalent part time/contractors. No new posts are likely to be created, but those existing will be protected for the life of the extended quarry.

Q What are the products made at the quarry used for?

A Over 50% of Wangford aggregate is used in the production on concrete at the Company's network of concrete plants in Suffolk and Norfolk, and by a number of its competitors. Sand is not sold from the site and is reused as restoration material within the quarry. The Company produces a number of specialist products from the quarry, including a roofing material used in the South East on flat roofs, and as a grinding media exported into Europe as the cobbles are chemically inert so don't contaminate the product being manufactured.

Q You are proposing to extract on an ANOB site where Curlews are situated? Surely you should rethink your proposals? What do the RSPB / Suffolk Wildlife Trust have to say on this?

A The Company is in the process of opening a dialogue with both RSPB and SWT. The Company is aware of comments locally regards curlews and these have been passed onto the ecologists it has commissioned. Part of the ecological assessment will be a bird survey and an assessment of the impact of the proposal on bird life will be undertaken using the results of that survey. The methodology for the survey has been agreed with Council officers and Natural England.

Q What are CEMEX's timescales?

A Ideally the Company would like to be quarrying Lime Kiln Farm by the end of 2019 to ensure consistency in supply to its customers. If this isn't possible the Company would seek to commence quarrying as soon as possible after the grant of permission, should permission be granted. At present the Company anticipated submitting a formal planning application before the end of 2018.